Tag Archives: Writers Life

Girl’s Choice

When I was in seventh grade a girl asked me to a “girls’ choice” dance.  It was the first formal type event I’d ever been asked to attend.  I was naïve and didn’t know that I was expected to buy and bring a corsage.

The girl and her mother were gracious about the fact that I didn’t bring a corsage, and the girl and I went on to the dance.

But I was so sensitive about what I considered my blunder that as we traded dances I’d say to my new dance partner,  “I wish they’d turn the lights down.”

Well those remarks got around to the girls at the dance and I was marked, not as dolt who didn’t buy a corsage, but a lothario who wanted the lights turned down.

Dr. Larry day is a retired J-School professor turned humor writer. His book, Day Dreaming: Tales From the Fourth Dementia is available for purchase via his website: http://www.daydreaming.co

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

A Thought While Walking the Dog

How many ants

On how many sidewalks

Have been stamped on

By laughing Children??

Dr. Larry day is a retired J-School professor turned humor writer. His book, Day Dreaming: Tales From the Fourth Dementia is available for purchase via his website: http://www.daydreaming.co

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Why I Write What I Write ©

I have been a journalist since I was 15 years old (I was the assistant bureau chief of the Idaho Falls Bureau of the Deseret News–a Salt Lake City Newspaper that circulated in IF.  I gave myself the title. It was a two-person bureau and my boss Joe Markham, was bureau chief.  Hence, by default,  I was assistant bureau chief (rather than “the kid that helps out in the office).  My job was to write local news late at night or at 4:30 a.m. for the afternoon edition of the paper.  I would type the information into a big old noisy, grouchy  teletype machine which translated the keystrokes into holes in a narrow never-ending roll of paper tape.  Once my story was written, I would contact the D. News newsroom in Salt Lake City (by typing in a code on the teletype).  What ever editor was doing “state news” on that shift would receive the story, acknowledge it, and more often than not, give me some advice about writing news stories.  AND (I’m finally getting to the point) MORE OFTEN THAN NOT THE ADVICE WAS “WRITE SHORTER LEDES  (LEAD PARAGRAPHS).”  It became a habit for me to write the shortest first graph I could.  This practice was re-enforced when I was a correspondent for United Press International in Buenos Aires.  If there were a breaking story that merited doing so, we sent news by cable (telegram).  Cable rates were 35 cents a word.  So we learned to write short, pithy ledes.  We also learned that prefixes and suffixes were counted as one word.  So we’d write such weird neologisms as  “Uncan (“can’t ” counted as two words) youward (“send you” is two words) details xxx until 0200 GMT. -30-” (Thirty was the age old news writer’s word for  “the end”.  That came from the time back in the days of handset type when the printer would use a 30-dash to separate one column of  information to another.  We had to write out the punctuation as words.  But “period” was “stop.”  If you aren’t thoroughly confused, please write back and I’ll unclarify it some more.

Anyway  that’s why, I write short ledes and generally short fiction pieces.

Dr. Larry day is a retired J-School professor turned humor writer. His book, Day Dreaming: Tales From the Fourth Dementia is available for purchase via his website: http://www.daydreaming.co

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Make Me A Skeptic

“Teach me to doubt the easy answers—the lazy ways of explaining any news event.”

Alfred P. Klausler and John De Mott, eds., “Prayer for Protection from Myself,” The Journalist’s Prayer Book,” Minneapolis, Minn., Augsburg Publishing House, 1972, p. 60.

 

Dr. Larry day is a retired J-School professor turned humor writer. His book, Day Dreaming: Tales From the Fourth Dementia is available for purchase via his website: http://www.daydreaming.co

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,